Archive for April, 2011


skate post

Skatboard or fence post?

PHOTO BY: CHRIS CULLINEY

Rideable fence post

PHOTO BY: CHRIS CULLINEY

Advertisements

Sometimes skating through the mist can be a pretty fun experience. It’s nice to have a change every once in a while.

Film and edit by Lee Eisler


Sam Trowbridge caught a heel edge riding his freebord with no helmet on 4-20-2011 at around 4:25 p.m. He hit his head and was rushed to the hospital where doctors did what they could to help him. Sam was pronounced brain dead this morning 4-21-2011 and died this afternoon surrounded by his family, girlfriend, and many of his friends.

Doctors say he did not suffer since he was knocked unconscious right away. Sam a member of the freebord pro team 2011 was at the beginning of a freebord journey that was to end up in San Francisco. He was in Auckland at the time of the accident.

Sam’s riding abilities, video editing skills and love for the sport was seen by all. He inspired many riders and touched peoples lives who he had never met.

The following are some of my favorite videos Sam has edited. A lot of these inspired me to get out there and ride.

SAM, WE WILL MISS YOU BUDDY!


Edit- Max Capps

We had so much fun shredding this morning that we had to make a short little edit. This is some clips from 2 runs on a Saturday at Gabby’s Morning Rampage session. Be sure to share it with your friends. -Gravity Rider

Find us on FACEBOOK, VIMEO, and TWITTER


Just getting a dose of adrenaline in San Diego with

Max Capps, Jimmy Riha, Duke Degan, Niko Kroha, and Jacob Budds,


The birthplace of downhill skateboarding is considering a ban on eight of the city’s steepest, windiest streets, spearheaded by a group of residents.

The group of Laguna Beach residents, led by Alan Bernstein, 62, oppose skateboarding down “their” hills and are trying to push for the city to place a ban to stop the sport.

Bernstein lives on Bluebird Canyon Drive and says that skateboarders zip by his home at high speeds. Between him and other Bluebird Canyon residents hundreds of near misses, brutal crashes and broken bones have been witnessed.

Drivers have reported close calls, having to swerve to avoid oncoming skaters. Many who have called the police to report these incidents found out that the skateboarders were doing nothing wrong according to the police officers.

Many feel as though it would be a liability issue, using the example of a woman who sued the city of Mission Viejo for brain damage her son suffered after a fall. He was not wearing a helmet.

Skateboarding in Laguna Beach has been around since 1957 and many consider it to be the birthplace of downhill skateboarding. With crews like the “Tuk ‘N’ Roller’s” bombing the streets in 1959 to the history of Oak Street going all the way back into the ‘70s when the Oak St. Surf Shop began selling nylon wheels.

In the ‘80s the popularity of the sport grew exponentially and someone cruising down the street with a surfboard under one arm was quite a common sight. Now it is more common to see riders traveling down roads at speeds averaging 40 mph sporting stylish helmets and specialized gloves with plastic attached.

As of right now skateboarders are considered pedestrians. Getting caught will bring you a pedestrian in the roadway citation.

After already holding several meetings pertaining to the issue, Laguna Beach city council met again March 29 to discuss the ban.

Interested people stood in line and respectively waited their turn to speak. Many spoke for the ban and many spoke against it. Both sides were very passionate for their cause.

After several hours the city council voted to ban skateboarding on eight of Laguna Beach’s most dangerous roads.

•Third Street between Park Avenue and Mermaid Street

•Diamond Street north of Carmelita Street

•Crestview Drive

•Temple Hills Drive

•Bluebird Canyon Drive between Morningside Drive and Cress Street

•Morningside Drive between the intersections of Rancho Laguna Road and Bluebird Canyon Drive

•Summit Drive between Katella Street and Bluebird Canyon Drive

•Alta Vista Way between Bonita and Solana ways

New regulations are also to be put in place. These include requiring skateboarders to stop at stop signs, limiting speeds to under 25 mph or the speed limit if it’s lower, yielding to traffic and keeping to their lane.

The idea of creating a road to the water tower designed for downhill skateboarders was discussed as a possible alternative for boarders to use.

As the sport’s popularity is growing, so is support for having no ban on streets. Younger kids are gaining their parents support in helping to practice the sport safely.

People opposed to the ban argued that they should have similar rights as joggers and bikers who are often seen traveling down these roads with no helmet.

The council will then review the issue again in six months time. -Gravity Rider


Just a fun adrenaline fueled day in the mountains with Danny Connor and John Rogers. Max Capps with the gopro footage.

Edit by Max Capps